Infectious Diseases Grand Rounds

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 -
11:00am to 12:00pm

SPEAKER: V.K. Viswanathan, PhD
TITLE: "Enterotoxigenic E. coli"

Speaker bio:
Dr. Viswanathan is an Associate Professor at the School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical sciences, as well as a Joint Associate Professor in the Department of Immunobiology, the Bio5 Institute, and the Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology at the University of Arizona.  He was named Chair-Elect for the American Society of Microbiology Southwestern Regional Branch (Arizona-Nevada Regional Branch) in the spring of 2016, and won the Outstanding Faculty in Research Award from the Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences in the spring of 2016.  Dr. Viswanathan is an Associate Professor at the School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical sciences, as well as a Joint Associate Professor in the Department of Immunobiology, the Bio5 Institute, and the Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology at the University of Arizona.  He was named Chair-Elect for the American Society of Microbiology Southwestern Regional Branch (Arizona-Nevada Regional Branch) in the spring of 2016, and won the Outstanding Faculty in Research Award from the Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences in the spring of 2016.

"My laboratory is interested in the interactions between pathogenic bacteria and host cells. Specifically, we study the mechanisms by which enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (“spinach- or hamburger E. coli”) and related bacteria cause disease. After attaching to epithelial cells in the intestine, these bacteria inject specific molecules into these cells via a specialized structure called the type III secretion system. The injected molecules specifically alter the biology of the host cells, presumably to support bacterial survival. We are interested in understanding the molecular alterations in the host cells resulting from these injected molecules, and how this eventually contributes to disease. Our studies also demonstrate that pathogenic E. coli suppress the death of host cells. Being extracellular pathogens, killing the host cell would likely result in a loss of the substratum thereby interfering with the ability to colonize. Our recent studies have focused on the mechanisms by which these pathogens manipulate the survival of host cells. On a broader level, we are interested in understanding how these pathogens are disseminated in the environment, and to eventually seek methods to control their spread."

 

This University of Arizona event is sponsored by the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, UA College of Medicine - Tucson. It is open to the public, particularly community physicians and other interested health-care professionals. Media are welcome to attend, but please contact us to confirm seating.

CONTACT: For more information, please email or call Andrew Pritchard or Myrna Seiter, (520) 626-6887.

Event Location: 
UAHS - College of Medicine - Tucson
Event Address: 

1501 N. Campbell Ave., Room 6210
Tucson, AZ 85724